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A picture of a baseball field.by: Christy Marion, PR & AR Specialists
@christymarion7

Pitching stories on behalf of your clients can be similar to that of a baseball game. Sometimes, you need to throw a couple good pitches before you get a hit and other times you strike out. To make sure the former happens more often than the latter, keep these three points in mind.

Strike one. There isn’t a balance.

Sometimes, it is easy to sound more like an advocate for a client than simply telling their story. The media is looking for a balanced story. They won’t publish something that sounds like an advertisement. If the pitch is one-sided, they are going to toss it in their trash inbox. It is always good to read your pitch from an objective angle before sending to a journalist.

Strike two. It isn’t newsworthy.

Regardless of the time you spend on your story pitch, if it isn’t newsworthy, editors will not be interested. Try to find the story inside your announcement. Always be sure it aligns with the news the journalist covers as well.

Strike three. You didn’t do your homework.

There is nothing worse than sounding like you have no idea what you are talking about. Make sure you research what topics the journalist or reporter covers, what region they cover and what they are most interested in.

Whether you are pitching to a journalist, news reporter or radio host, be sure to know the purpose of your pitch and who your target audience is. It is up to the PR representative to establish a good relationship with the media. Be proactive and reach out even when you don’t have a pitch. This shows you’re interested in developing a connection. We can’t guarantee a home run every time, but being conscious of these points will help improve your game.